Gun Violence Prevention Resources

This week, Pastor Adam Hamilton sent out a letter to United Methodists with sample letters to send our representatives.

You can also call the Capitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and demand action to prevent gun violence and enact lifesaving gun legislation.

Here are the letters:

LETTER FROM REV. ADAM HAMILTON
Dear United Methodists,
In the wake of the shooting in Uvalde, Texas, I am sending letters to my Representatives in Congress and in the state legislature asking them to do more to protect our children from violence.
There have been 27 school shootings and 228 mass shootings (four or more victims) in the US since January 1, 2022. Because of our differences over guns, we find ourselves in gridlock and nothing changes.

These are not problems far from home:
· Two of our members were killed at the Jewish Community Center several years ago by a
gun purchased in a straw man sale.
· The daughter of one of our pastors was killed while at First Fridays when a group of teens
were shooting guns at each other a block away.
· This spring a student came to Olathe East High with a gun and shot two people before
being stopped – my nephew and many of your kids were in school there that day.


We can throw up our hands and nothing changes. Or, we can ask our legislators to address the root causes and develop better strategies to decrease the chances of school shootings and other acts of violence. Attached are two letters I will be sending to my representatives that I’d like to invite you to send to your representatives at the state and federal level. The specific suggestions related to guns are suggestions that were supported by an overwhelming number of our gun owners at Resurrection in a survey completed several years ago.

  1. Find your representatives’ names and e-mail addresses here: https://openstates.org.
  2. Copy the text of the letter below and paste it into an email. (Note: there are two versions –
    one for federal representatives and one for state representatives.)
  3. Address it to your representatives by name, sign your name at the end and send it.
  4. Feel free to tweak the letter so that it represents your views.
    Over Memorial Day weekend there were 14 more mass shootings, including six people
    injured at a High School graduation in Alabama and another six teens injured in a mass
    shooting in Tennessee. Let’s encourage our representatives to do all they can to reduce
    these incidences of violence.

    Thank you for considering this.
    Adam Hamilton
    Senior Pastor
    The United Methodist Church of the Resurrection

SAMPLE LETTER FOR FEDERAL LEGISLATORS

Dear Member of Congress,
Thank you for the work you do every day on behalf of the American people and on my behalf as my Representative.


Last week we all grieved as 19 children and two teachers were killed at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. We shared that grief as Republicans and Democrats. You likely know that since January 1, 2022 there have been 27 shootings at schools across America. Some were suicides. Some were children who accidentally discharged guns, and some were teens who took their guns to school with the intent to kill. Twenty-seven school shootings.


Congress has united around solving major problems in the past. You’ve been bi-partisan in your support for Ukraine, spending billions to help Ukraine fend off Russia. What could be possible if Republicans and Democrats saw the deaths of these children in Uvalde, Texas, as a chance to address this issue together? This is our moonshot, our chance to solve a problem and make the world a better place.


To that end, I write to encourage bi-partisan efforts to reduce school shootings focused on:


Research Funding Focused on Reducing Violence Committed by and against Children: We can address this problem, but it will take bi-partisan support of serious research identifying root causes of this violence and practical solutions to address this problem.· Please increase funding for research at the federal level on causes of and actions that can be taken to reduce violence committed by young adults, and against children and teens.


Responsible Gun Storage: The largest number of gun deaths each year are suicides, often with young adults using guns owned by their parents. In addition, there are children who find guns and inadvertently harm themselves.
· Please pass legislation requiring guns be stored with a trigger lock in place. This will help prevent needless deaths and the misuse of guns in a home.


Licensure & Training: Permit laws are the single most effective way to reduce gun violence. States with permit laws of any kind have less gun violence than those without.
· Please provide incentives to states where permit and training laws already exist, and to those where they are expanded, or are enacted.


Background Checks: Background checks are among the easiest laws to thwart through private party sales, straw man sales and some gun shows and trading of weapons.
· Please establish processes and upgrade technology to help states share this information seamlessly and quickly to maximize public safety.


We can do something about this. These are our nation’s children. You have the power, as legislators, to leave a legacy of safer schools and better policies to protect the lives of our children. I’m pleading with you to please act.

Sincerely,
Your Name


SAMPLE LETTER FOR STATE LEGISLATORS

Dear State Legislators,
Thank you for the work you do on my behalf as representatives. Last week we all grieved for the lives of 19 children and two teachers killed at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.

We shared that grief as Republicans and Democrats. You likely know that since January 1, 2022 there have been 27 shootings at schools across America. Some were suicides. Some were children who accidentally discharged guns, and some were teens who took their guns to school with the intent to kill.

Our state legislature has united around solving major problems in our state in the past. You’ve worked across the aisle to do what was in the best interest of our state. I’d like to ask that you work across the aisle, Republicans and Democrats, to reduce the likelihood of violence against children as we saw in Uvalde, Texas, this last week. I know you care about our state’s children. Please, take action to protect our children.

To that end, I write to encourage bi-partisan efforts to reduce school shootings focused on:

Expanding Mental Health Access:
· Please increase investments in mental health services and raise the gun ownership age to 21.

Responsible Gun Storage: The largest number of gun deaths each year are suicides, often with young adults using guns owned by their parents. In addition, children find guns and inadvertently harm themselves.
· Please pass legislation requiring guns be stored with a trigger lock in place. This will help prevent the needless deaths and the misuse of parents’ guns by children.

Licensure and Training: Permit laws are the single most effective way to reduce gun violence. States with permit laws of any kind have less gun violence than those without.
· Please reinstate or expand licenses and training requirements to own a gun.

Background Checks: Background checks are among the easiest laws to thwart through private party sales, straw man sales, gun shows and trading of weapons.
· Please pass universal background checks for all gun purchases, trades and transfers.

You have the power, as legislators, to leave a legacy of safer schools, and better policies to protect the lives of our children. I’m pleading with you to please act.


Sincerely,

Your Name


In our United Methodist Book of Resolutions we have a Call to End Gun Violence.

RESOLUTION

Our Call to End Gun Violence

2016 Book of Resolutions, #3428


Jesus’ call to his followers to be peacemakers (Matthew 5:9) is tied to intimate relationship with God, and echoes God’s dreams for peace for all of creation as expressed in Micah 4:1-4:

“In days to come, / the mountain of the Lord’s house / shall be established as the highest of the mountains, / and shall be raised up above the hills. / Peoples shall stream to it, / and many nations shall come and say: / ‘Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, / to the house of the God of Jacob; / that he may teach us his ways / and that we may walk in his paths.’ / For out of Zion shall go forth instruction, / and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem. / He shall judge between many peoples, / and shall arbitrate between strong nations far away; / they shall beat their swords into plowshares, / and their spears into pruning hooks; / nation shall not lift up sword against nation, / neither shall they learn war any more; / but they shall all sit under their own vines and under their own fig trees, / and no one shall make them afraid; / for the mouth of the Lord of hosts has spoken” (NRSV).

Micah’s prophetic dream points to a time when all peoples will journey to God’s presence so God “may teach us his ways and that we may walk in his paths” (4:2). Micah describes God as the final judge and the nations will travel to God’s presence out of their desire to live in peace without violence and bloodshed.

The stunning imagery of Micah’s dream is the transformation of weapons into instruments of harvesting food that occurs after the judgments are handed down to the nations. The transformation is not complete until the nations participate in their own transformation. The work that went into creating the weapons will be matched by the human effort it will take to transform those weapons into peaceful instruments. God does not collect or hide the weapons from the nations, nor does God transform the weapons outside of human effort. The text states that the nations themselves, “shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks.”

Violence, in so many ways, is fueled by fear and self-protection. Iron plows and pruning tools can be used as weapons. Yet, in Micah’s vision, genuine peace and security are given to all people by God after the weapons of violence are transformed: “they shall all sit under their own vines and under their own fig trees, and no one shall make them afraid.” Culture as well as weapons will be transformed: Indeed, “neither shall they learn war any more.” Whether it happens in the towns of northeastern Nigeria, a suburb in the United States, the streets of Australia, or an office in France, gun violence has become an all-too-often frightening phenomenon. We need the reality of Micah’s vision more than ever.

Small arms include assault rifles, submachine guns, light machine guns, grenade launchers, portable anti-aircraft guns and anti-tank guns, among other weapons (Small Arms Survey, http://www.smallarmssurvey.org/weapons-and-markets/definitions.html). Nations encumbered with violence from small arms face the greatest obstacles to delivering social services to those who need them the most (Ibid.). Armed violence contributes to crime, human trafficking, drug trafficking, gender-based violence, racial and ethnic conflicts, systemic economic inequalities, persistent unemployment, and human rights abuses among other social maladies (Small Arms Survey, http://www.smallarmssurvey.org/armed-violence/social-and-economic-costs/impact-on-development.html). In many countries small arms are the greatest hindrance to food security.

One crucial step toward curbing this violence on an international scale is the Arms Trade Treaty that passed the United Nations in 2013. Its focus is to prevent arms from being traded into already dangerous situations. The treaty does not regulate the trade of small arms within nations. In adopting the treaty, the 118 nations that signed it and the 31 nations that have already ratified it are stating that gun violence is a universal problem devastating lives and creating tremendous instability in nations and entire regions in the world (http://disarmament.un.org/treaties/t/att/deposit/asc).

Gun violence also greatly affects families and individuals. One of the most prominent forms of gun violence is suicide. Worldwide, there are nearly one million suicides every year, which amounts to more than 3,000 per day (World Health Organization, International Association for Suicide Prevention, http://www.who.int/mental_health/prevention/suicide/suicideprevent/en/, Worldwide Suicide Prevention Day is September 10, http://www.iasp.info/wspd/). While not all of these involve firearms access to firearms makes suicide more attainable for many who attempt it. Indeed, firearms are the most frequent method for suicides in countries where firearms are common in private households (World Health Organization, http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/86/9/07-043489/en/).

When domestic violence incidents involve the use of firearms the results are often deadly. “Gender inequality, tolerance and cultural acceptance of the use of violence against women, and common notions of masculinity that embrace firearms possession (which may be supported by both men and women) all combine to create a climate that places women at risk of Intimate Partner Violence involving firearms” (Small Arms Survey, http://www.smallarmssurvey.org/fileadmin/docs/A-Yearbook/2013/en/Small-Arms-Survey-2013-Chapter-2-summary-EN.pdf). A US-based study of mass shootings between January 2009 and January 2013 revealed that 57 percent of the incidents involved the killing of a family member, or a current or former intimate partner of the shooter (https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.mayorsagainstillegalguns.org/images/analysis-of-recent-mass-shootings.pdf).

As followers of Jesus, called to live into the reality of God’s dream of shalom as described by Micah, we must address the epidemic of gun violence so “that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in God’s paths.” Therefore, we call upon United Methodists to prayerfully address gun violence in their local context. Some of the ways in which to prevent gun violence include the following:

  1. For congregations to make preventing gun violence a regular part of our conversations and prayer times. Gun violence must be worshipfully and theologically reflected on, and we encourage United Methodist churches to frame conversations theologically by utilizing resources such as “Kingdom Dreams, Violent Realities: Reflections on Gun Violence from Micah 4:1-4” produced by the General Board of Church and Society.
  2. For congregations to assist those affected by gun violence through prayer, pastoral care, creating space, and encouraging survivors to share their stories, financial assistance, and through identifying other resources in their communities as victims of gun violence and their families walk through the process of grieving and healing.
  3. For individual United Methodists who own guns as hunters or collectors to safely and securely store their guns and to teach the importance of practicing gun safety.
  4. For United Methodist congregations that have not experienced gun violence to form ecumenical and interfaith partnerships with faith communities that have experienced gun violence in order to support them and learn from their experiences.
  5. For United Methodist congregations to lead or join in ecumenical or interfaith gatherings for public prayer at sites where gun violence has occurred and partner with law enforcement to help prevent gun violence.
  6. For United Methodist congregations to partner with local law-enforcement agencies and community groups to identify gun retailers that engage in retail practices designed to circumvent laws on gun sales and ownership, encourage full legal compliance, and to work with groups like Heeding God’s Call that organize faith-based campaigns to encourage gun retailers to gain full legal compliance with appropriate standards and laws.
  7. For United Methodist congregations to display signs that prohibit carrying guns onto church property.
  8. For United Methodist congregations to advocate at the local and national level for laws that prevent or reduce gun violence. Some of those measures include:
    • Universal background checks on all gun purchases
    • Ratification of the Arms Trade Treaty
    • Ensuring all guns are sold through licensed gun retailers
    • Prohibiting all individuals convicted of violent crimes from purchasing a gun for a fixed time period
    • Prohibiting all individuals under restraining order due to threat of violence from purchasing a gun
    • Prohibiting persons with serious mental illness, who pose a danger to themselves and their communities, from purchasing a gun
    • Ensuring greater access to services for those suffering from mental illness
    • Establishing a minimum age of 21 years for a gun purchase or possession
    • Banning large-capacity ammunition magazines and weapons designed to fire multiple rounds each time the trigger is pulled
    • Promoting new technologies to aid law-enforcement agencies to trace crime guns and promote public safety.

ADOPTED 2016

See Social Principles, ¶ 162.

To purchase the Book of Resolutions, click here.

Copyright © 2016, The United Methodist Publishing House, used by permission